Tapinauchenius revision

Information, Psuedoclamoris, Revision, Tapinauchenius, Taxonomy No Comments »
Tapinuachenius rasti by Tom Patterson

Tapinuachenius rasti by Tom Patterson

As 2018 is rolling to an end we find ourselves with another big taxonomic revision of a genus.  The genera of Tapinauchenius (Ausserer, 1871) as well as Psalmopoeus (Pocock, 1895) have never been reviews or revised before, even though new species have been described in recent years. (As early as 2014 by Jorge Mendoza – Psalmopoeus victori)

So what does this all mean to you?

Well…Quite a bit. Through extensive research Martin Hüsser, was able to revise and also re-describe the following tarantulas:

Tapinauchenius sp Colombia (A new species from the Amazon region) is now Pseudoclamoris burgessi

Tapinauchenius gigas is now Psuedoclamoris gigas

Tapinauchenius elenae is now Psuedoclamoris elenae

Tapinauchenius sp Union Island is now Tapinauchenius rasti

Tapinauchenius sanctivicenti is now Tapinauchenius polybotes

Tap subcaeruleus is now nomen dubium (meaning there is not enough accurate data to precisely describe or confirm this species)

In addition to all of this, the genera/Subfamily Psalmoponinae has been revised to include the following genus families; Ephebopus, Psalmopoeus, Psuedoclamoris and Tapinauchenius.

Why you ask?

The way Psalmponinae is diagnosed is based on molecular and morphological phylogenies. Which you can look at as a family tree where your great-grandparents are the same relatives as your distant cousins.

Though for some of you it may be annoying to have to remake labels and re-learn new nomenclature, its definitely the right thing to do. Taxonomy long ago was nowhere near as specific and precise as it is today. Hence why so much has been placed in the wrong genera or simply left undescribed. When a genus gets moved or changed to a new genus it just means it was never meant to be in that old genus to begin with. There has never been a better time to be part of the hobby.

 

Full revision article can be found here

Sri Lanka Tarantulas (Poecilotheria) in the US

Information, Old World, Poecilotheria, Taxonomy No Comments »

USFWS has posted their final rule regarding five species of Sri Lankan tarantulas (Poecilotheria). The species below will be listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The rule becomes effective on August 30, 2018.

Poecilotheria smithi

1. Poecilotheria fasciata;
2. P. ornata;
3. P. smithi;
4. P. subfusca;
5. P. vittata.

Summary regarding the future domestic trade of these species. The below activities are prohibited under ESA:

■ Interstate and foreign commercial activity;
■ Selling or offering for sale in interstate or foreign commerce;
■ Import or export (without a permit from FWS for conservation purposes);
■ Possess, ship, deliver, carry, transport, sell or receive unlawfully taken wildlife.

Intrastate Commerce and Possession are legal:

Commercial activities that take place entirely in one state involving legally acquired and captive-bred endangered or threatened species are not prohibited by the ESA. This means you may keep and/or breed ESA-listed species.

Offer for Sale:

Endangered and threatened species may be advertised for sale but the advertisement must state that no sale may not occur until an interstate commerce permit (Captive Bred Wildlife, or CBW, permit) has been obtained from the Service for both parties involved. CBW permits are now rarely, if ever, provided to anyone outside of professional zoological institutions.

Full source: here

Credit to: USARK

Photo Credit: Tom Patterson

Best Beginner Tarantulas

Aphonopelma, Brachypelma, Grammostola, Information, Lasiodora, New World, Old World No Comments »

So you’ve decided you want a tarantula. You’ve become obsessed with watching feeding videos, molting videos, grooming videos, unpacking videos, hell, maybe you’ve even watched a couple of breeding videos – but what tarantula is right for you? Depending on your experience with other exotic animals, you may find yourself capable of what might otherwise be considered an intermediate species, but here is my list of the top 5 beginning species (with many bonus options) for those just starting out.

 

Even though I have narrowed this list down to five specific species, these species were chosen with an entire genus in mind. This widely opens your choices, which will largely be aesthetic. Like bright colors? Or jet black? Guess what, both choices can lay within the same genus – giving you varying types of eye candy with the same care needs and behaviors. And what qualities make a good beginner species, anyway? Species that hardy, eat well, grow quickly or grow large, move slowly, are not likely to bite, and have low venom potency are all qualities most people look for when looking for their first pet tarantula.

 

Grammostola pulchripes

Grammostola pulchripes (Chaco Golden Knee Tarantula): Okay, so I am a little biased with this species because it is what I personally started out with when I first got into tarantulas, and I’ll tell you why! Not only is this species hardy and of a very gentle disposition – but they get big and are quite lovely with their contrasting colors. Other species in this genus are also great choices because of their hardiness and there are a variety of colors you can choose from. Out of this genus, Grammostola rosea is often recommended as a beginner, but is known to be rather two-faced – calm and tolerant one moment, and ready to bite anything that moves the next. As long as you are not planning on handling though, that won’t be a problem! Other favorites in this genus include G. pulchra (the Brazilian Black) and G. iheringi (the Entre Rios – beautiful but a bit uncommon).

Brachypelma albopilosum

Brachypelma albopilosum (the Curly Hair Tarantula): Now, this species is just fun. Although it is largely brown, it’s charm lies in its long and (you guessed it) curly hairs. This species, and the others in its genus, are very easy to care for. Although many other Brachypelma species are more striking to look at due to their red or orange hues, the albopilosum is much less likely to flick hairs. Although many of the brachypelma genus are slow moving and easy to handle, their urticating hairs may leave you itching for hours, so handling is not recommended. Out of this genus, I have found that vagans is the most likely to show some attitude – and that can be a pro OR a con depending on what you like!

Lasiodora parahybana

Lasiodora parahybana (Salmon Pink Tarantula): Not only is the species fairly docile and a pinch to take care of – it is very cheap and easy to find! It is also one of the largest-growing species, reaching over 10 inches in size. This species is a fantastic eater and grows quickly, adding to its perks. There are other species in this genus that would be equally great choices, but their availability will be lower and their price will be more. Temperament can vary greatly between individual specimens, with attitude showing as they grow larger. Although their urticating hairs are not as bad as those belonging to Brachypelma, many people still have some sensitivities to them. Another perk despite the large size and voracious appetite of these tarantulas is their likelihood to hang out in the open for your viewing pleasure.

Aphonopelma chalcodes
Aphonopelma chalcodes (the Desert Blonde Tarantula): Just like the above suggestions, this genus has a ton of options. It is the genus that holds the tarantulas native to the United States, and species from this genus can be found through North and Central America. Care of species in this genus are similar to Brachypelma species, and there are a variety of species available to choose from. Although many species can be found close to home for American hobbyists, some species can still fetch a hefty price-tag due to captive bred Aphonopelma species being uncommon. They are not exactly fast growing, but you can usually pick up a juvenile or adult specimen for less than many other species of tarantulas.

Euathlus sp Red
Eathlus sp. Red (the Chilean Flame Tarantula): If a larger spider is not what you are picturing as your first spider, this dwarf species may be up your alley. This is a great species in that it is VERY docile and it’s care needs are simple. As this is a dwarf species barely reaching three inches, you’ll want to aim for a sub-adult or adult to ensure its easy-to-care for quality. This is a curious species that is apt to wanting to see what is going on outside of its enclosure. This species is incredibly slow growing, but for those just starting out a specimen of at least one inch could be just what you need to get your feet wet.
Written by: Christina Vulyak