Brachypelma baumgarteni vs boehmei

Anatomy, Brachypelma, Information, New World No Comments »

Hello fellow Brachypelma hobbyists! 

To start, I’ve been wanting to post photos of these two species and give a brief description between them. So I’m writing this for the many people who have a hard time IDing the two species. Obviously DNA would be the best way to tell them apart. However most of us are just miserable hobbyists that sometimes count on trusting and relying vendors and people like myself posting photos and selling the true species between baumgarteni and boehmei. If you wish to know who the current vendors are selling true Brachypelma baumgarteni private message me and I’ll be more than happy to tell you.

 

If you have purchased a tarantula that was sold as B.boehmei but has the appearance of a B.baumgarteni it’s most likely 99% a hybrid. You should be asking yourself the following: Why was it sold as boehmei? Why does it have the appearance of a baumgarteni? What are the years known that Brachypelma baumgarteni were successfully bred? Who were the breeders that successfully bred first and second inbred generations of Brachypelma baumgarteni? What were the known years and who imported Brachypelma baumgarteni? Who recently successfully bred first generation Brachypelma baumgarteni and where were they imported from? Was Brachypelma baumgarteni ever successfully bred in the USA and who bred them? Once you have these answers you’ll know the history of this beautiful species.

 

Pictured below is a Brachypelma baumgarteni immature male specimen of mine that is 4.25″ inches. My only wish is that the baumgarteni male was a bit bigger and had more of an adult appearance but these current photos will do for now. The baumgarteni male was imported out of Europe, it is the second inbreeding generation of this species, mated by Eddy Hijmensen “Metallica”. Also pictured below is a Brachypelma boehmei specimen of mine who was also imported out of Europe.

 

A brief description:

As  B.baumgarteni starts growing the species will have lots of dark/black hair coloration around the lighting bolt pattern on the metatarsal. On all eight legs the lighting bolt pattern on the metatarsal will be equally visually seen vs the boehmei with a black line on the metatarsal on all eight legs. Brachypelma baumgarteni is light beige, peach coloration vs boehmei a fire red color.

On the carapace between B.baumgarteni and B.boehmei and detail appearance between the two species is a huge difference as well. With the hybrids among us I understand that it would be difficult for most of you to determine and whether a specimen you’ve acquired or seen photo of is a hybrid or a true species. Since I have previously owned both hybrids and true species of each, I like to think I’ve done a good job of helping others properly ID some specimens. Plus knowing the history of a successful breeding is a major tool to use as well. Please keep in mind I’m no taxonomists but a miserable hobbyists that can only give you my best expert opinion by my experience of owning these true species as well with the hybrids I’ve also owned in the past.

 

Anyways enjoy these photos of both the Brachypelma baumgarteni vs Brachypelma boehmei.

(click to expand images)
Brachyeplma baumgarteni 1

Brachyeplma baumgarteni

Brachypelma boehmei 1

Brachypelma boehmei

Brachypelma baumgarteni

B.baumgarteni

Bracypelma boehmei

B.boehmei

Brachypelma baumgarteni

B.baumgarteni

Brachypelma boehmei

B.boehmei

Brachypelma baumgarteni

B.baumgarteni

Brachypelma boehmei

B.boehmei

Brachypelma baumgarteni

B.baumgarteni

Brachypelma boehmei

B.boehmei

Brachypelma baumgarteni

B.baumgarteni

Brachypelma boehmei

B.boehmei

Brachypelma baumgarteni

B.baumgarteni

Brachypelma boehmei

B.boehmei

Article by Jose Berrios

Photos by: Jose Berrios/Exoskeleton Invertebrates

Colombian Giant Redleg (Megaphobema robustum)

Megaphobema, New World No Comments »

The Colombian Giant Redleg tarantula comes from the tropical rainforests of Colombia and Brazil. Considered an average sized species they reach sizes of 6″ to 8″ in leg span at full growth. Known for their velevet black and red colors they are most definitely a beautiful species. They are fairly quick growers with males reaching maturity within 3 to 5 years and females growing to be up to 15 years old. 

Megaphobema RobustumMegaphobema Robustum

Photo Credit: @Andrea.Arachnid

 

Habitat: The Colombian Giant Redleg is a terrestrial tarantula but can be an obligate burrower. Though their sizes can differ and mature species can be anywhere between 6″ to 8″ we recommend you keep them at full growth in a 10 gallon tank. Make sure you have at least 6″ of substrate to allow your tarantula to burrow should it feel the need to in addition to having a nice startup hide for it. As slings these can be kept in vial and later on a deli cup. Though the more hardier of Megaphobema sp. we recommend you keep the Megaphobema robustum at a slight lower temperature as most tarantulas. We recommend temperatures of 75°F to 84°F with a humidity of 70 to 85%. They do not do well with higher temperatures and a close eye on them should be kept. As always an overflowing water dish should always be kept in the enclosure.

 

Feeding: Overall great eaters we recommend flightless fruitflies when small slings and later switching it over to small pinhead crickets. Feel free to crush their heads to prevent them hurting your spiderling. You can feed your Megaphobema robustum a mixed variety of crickets, roaches, meal worms and locusts. Be careful of your tarantula being in pre-molt and not wanting to eat. If prey is not eaten within 24 hours of being placed in the enclosure feel free to remove and leave your tarantula alone for at least 1 week as she or he can be ready to molt.

 

Attitude: Though not aggressive, Megaphobema robustum have urticating hairs which they carry in both their abdomen and back legs. As a defense mechanism they tend to raise their abdomen and flick off a lot of urticating hairs compared to many other species. A fairly shy tarantula they prefer to run then to to show threat posture. They can bite, though harmless, can be equivalent to a bee sting.

 

A great tarantula overall and definitely should be part of any collection!

 

Flame Rump Tree Spider (Thrixopelma ockerti)

New World, Thrixopelma No Comments »

The Flame Rump Tree Spider or Thrixopelma ockerti is a semi-arboreal tarantula from Peru. They are somewhat rare as they are very hard to breed. Adults have a dark blueish grey body color with a reddish colored rump. As spiderlings they tend to be more brown and green in color with a golden red rump. Their abdomen almost have an elongated shape. The Flame Rump Tree Spider grows to be about 5 to 6 inches in length with females outliving males. Not much is known as to how old they grow to be but it is assumed that females will live to be 10 to 15 years old while males tend to live to be 3 to 4 years.

Thrixopelma ockerti

 

Habitat: This one is a weird one. Because they are semi-arboreal your enclosure needs to be both tall and wide. At full growth your enclosure will need about 18 inches in height and 12 inches in length. This will allow your tarantula to climb and roam the enclosure as s/he seems fit. As spiderlings they have been known to burrow but a vial with enough substrate and small piece of twig or bark should be perfect. For substrate we recommend coconut fiber kept somewhat damp. This tarantula does well with low humidity. Temperature should be kept between 65° to 85° F with a humidity of about 60%. Make sure to always keep a water dish overfilled in the enclosure at all times. Being that this tarantula does not spend all its time climbed up you can keep the water dish on the ground.

 

Feeding: This tarantula is a very hardy eater. As spiderlings we feed them small pinhead crickets with their heads crushed in to prevent them from harming the slings. As juveniles and all the way into adulthood they can be kept on a great diet of roaches, worms, crickets, locusts and a variety of other insects.

 

Attitude: The Peruvian Flame Rump Tree Spider is quite docile. It can be extremely skittish and you can expect it to flick a lot of urticating hairs. The Perucian Flame Rump Tree Spider can bite and this can cause some discomfort. The bite is not medically significant and at most can be compared to a bee sting.

 

This is a collector’s dream tarantula and can be great for any beginner. It is always out and about showing off its amazing looks and is incredibly docile. We of course always recommend not handling the tarantula if you do not need to.