Kilimanjaro Mustard Baboon (Pterinochilus chordatus)

Old World, Pterinochilus No Comments »

The Kilimanjaro Mustard Baboon Spider is an old world tarantula from the eastern part of Africa and can be found in Tanzania and Sudan. They grow to be about 4 to 5 inches in length with females living to be as old as 20 years old and males living to be about 3 to 5 years old. The true colors of the Kilimanjaro Mustard Baboon is dark grey and black with a thin orange tint at the knees however there is a light color form of this species that is orange/brown and black.

pterinochilus chordatus

 

Habitat: As full grown adults the most you will need for the kilimanjaro mustard baboon a 5 gallon enclosure. They are obligate burrowers though do just fine with a startup hide or piece of bark to live under. They are pretty good at webbing. Though not heavy webbers like their distant cousin the OBT. We recommend you give them 5 to 6 inches of damp substrate in the event your baboon does end up burrowing. Temperatures should be kept in the higher 70’s Fahrenheit with humidity levels of about 60 to 65 percent. As slings they do just fine in vials and at 1 inch in size can easily be transferred to deli cups.  As always a good water source should always be available in their enclosure whether its a water dish or spraying.

 

Feeding: These guys are voracious eaters. As slings you can feed them fruitflies and pinhead crickets with their heads smashed in. One of the few species that personally goes out to hunt instead of waiting for you to throw prey towards them. You can feed them a variety of meals such as crickets, roaches, mealworms, superworms and even locusts. Feeding once a week would be ideal.

 

Attitude: Being old world they come packed with attitude. Though not as fast and aggressive as their cousin the P.murinus. You should still use caution when opening their enclosure to feed or do maintenance. Their bite can bring a world of pain and they have potent venom. Though not lethal it can induce muscle pains, cramps, headaches and nausea. We recommend you to not handle this tarantulas!

 

All in all a definite beauty to have and most definitely a less aggressive alternative to the OBT if you are planning on getting a good hardy African tarantula.

Orange Baboon Tarantula (Pterinochilus murinus)

Old World, Pterinochilus 4 Comments »

The Orange Baboon Tarantula also known as the “Orange Bitey Thing” is a species of tarantula from Eastern Africa.  They can grow up to 6 inches in size. Males usually live to be around 6 to 8 years while females live easily between 8 to 12 years. They are nocturnal and you will see him actively during the night. The OBT is a species best handled by expert hobbyists due to its speed and aggression. They are highly favorited in any big collection due to their temperament and robust orange colors.

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Habitat:

For the Orange Baboon Tarantula it is recommended you have a terrarium between 5 to 10 gallons to make sure you give it enough space to move. In addition your substrate should also be damp to the touch. Make sure you are giving your tarantula at least 5 to 6 inches of substrate. The p.murinus is a well known burrower and will burrow itself its own hide. In addition they will end up laying a lot of silk threads around and inside their burrows to feel vibrations of anything coming nearby. You can add an additional hide in your enclosure but most of the time it will be unused by your OBT. Make sure it also has enough water and a full water dish should always be readily available for it. Misting the enclosure once a week is also recommended. As for temperature, you are going to want to keep your enclosure nice and warm between 77 to 87 degrees during the day and around 70 degrees at night. Make sure your tank also has a humidity level of about 60 percent.

 

Feeding:

A steady diet of large crickets and B.dubia cockroaches should be fine for this species. On occasion you can also throw in pinky mice (pinks) to switch it up. As with most Orange Baboon Tarantulas feeding is not a problem at all.

 

Attitude:

The Orange Baboon Tarantula is known for having a bad attitude. When threatened most adults actually stand their ground while threatening an intruder by rearing up its back legs, striking the ground while hissing. They are extremely fast and if they feel like there is no escape from threat they will waste no time striking and biting. Their bite is considered one of the worst out of all tarantula species. Their venom though not lethal to humans can still inflict quite a bit of pain with most bite cases reported include muscle cramps extreme pain and heavy swelling.

 

We recommend the Orange Baboon Tarantula to never be handled even by the most expert of hobbyists. It is more of a tarantula to admire from the other site of the glass enclosure. Should you need to handle in the event of rehousing or maintenance of its enclosure please do so carefully. It has no urticating hairs so you might not even get a warning before a bite. We certainly do not recommend this tarantula for the novice tarantula owner but we certainly admire it as a must have species for the skilled connoisseur.

 

Do you have an Orange Baboon Tarantula? Comment about it and share your experience(s) with us.  Have any questions? Ask away in the bellow comments.